Is training your dog a habit?

Change of habits, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michigan

In business circles, a common topic of discussion is whether or not leaders are born to lead. And so too, I ask are people born with dog training skills or do they develop them?

It may seem obvious, that people develop the skills because most people see the value in getting their dog professionally trained. However, there are those who have a passion and love for dog training as a profession, sport or hobby, have an easier time relating to dogs than others, are easily able to recognize stress, fear and aggressive behavior signs in dogs, and are more coordinated. So which is it, born with greater skills or trained?

Greek Philosopher Aristotle, Michigan Dog Training

Aristotle

Aristotle said it best, “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” So too is dog training. Even the most uncoordinated and first time dog owner can learn to bond, relate and train their dog with help from an experienced dog trainer as long as they consider the training of their dog to be a habit and not an one time act.

If you don’t have the time and patience to train your dog then its’ best to have a professional train your dog via a board and train or day training program. However, if you do have the time and patience as well as the motivation and commitment; then group classes or private training lessons are a good choice.

As you progress through the weekly lessons be sure to put practice time on your schedule. Just like going to the gym, it’s more likely to happen if you reserve time on your calendar and commit to it. Otherwise, life gets in the way and your attendance at the gym will suffer. Thus, you need to reserve time on the calendar for you and your dog. Otherwise, life will interrupt the best intentions of training your dog.

The good news is, you don’t have to reserve big blocks of time to train your dog at one time, such as a hour or even a half hour. Frequency of practice sessions utilizing Deep Practice or Deliberate Practice (defined by Daniel Coyle in his book, The Little Book of Talent, 52 Tips for Improving Skills as “The form of learning marked by 1) the willingness to operate on the edge of your ability, aiming for targets that are just out of reach, and 2) the embrace of attentive repetition.”) are more important than the length of the sessions. Therefore, for a pet dog to be transformed into a well mannered family member, I recommend the following minimum training sessions:

  •  Pups 10-19 weeks of age:  10-15 minute sessions, 3-4 sessions per day, 5 days per week
  •  Dogs 20 weeks and older:  20 minute sessions, 3 sessions per day, 5 days per week

Once your happy with your dog’s new obedience skills, you can switch from having scheduled training sessions with your dog to practicing good manners throughout your everyday life. As you remain consistent with the new standards you hold for your dog and for yourself, the training will cease to be an act and grow to be a habit with amazing potential and results.

February 2016 Dog Titles at MDT

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On February 23, 2016 several dog teams passed the American Kennel Club (AKC) Puppy S.T.A.R.  program or earned their Canine Good Citizen (CGC) title at Michigan Dog Training in Plymouth, Michigan. Congratulations to the all the dog teams!

A. Puppy S.T.A.R.

  1. Timothy Lease and his dog Larry, a Great Dane mix of Livonia, Michigan
  2. Jeremy and Liz Breitner and Lily Breitner, a Shetland Sheepdog of Westland, Michigan
  3. Logan Gaines and Jade, a Siberian Husky of Livonia, Michigan
  4. Heather Gilghrist and Charlie, a Golden Retriever of Novi, Michigan
  5. Gabrielle Kuziq and Lulu, a Rottweiler of Flatrock, Michigan
  6. John Weyer and Sterling, a Labrador Retriever of Canton, Michigan
  7. Iotis Even and Rook, an Old Time Scotch Collie of Canton, Michigan
  8. Kris Wolfe and Rosie Bella, a Golden Retriever of Livonia, Michigan

B. CGC

  1. Marcy Radwick and Philo, a Weimaraner of Plymouth, Michigan
  2. Diane Davis and Rocco Elvis Davis, a German Shepherd Dog of Livonia, Michigan
  3. Laurie Blondy and Bennington Hills Daisy II, a Golden Retriever of Northville, Michigan
  4. Michael Hurley and Dewey, a Dutch Shepherd of Plymouth, Michigan

The next round of puppy and adult dog obedience group classes start the second week of March 2016.  To register, click on the blue icon button that says, “Book Online” on the home page.

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January 2015 Dog Training Classes

basic dog training class, Michigan Dog Training

Basic Group Class

Michigan Dog Training in Plymouth, Michigan has posted its January and February 2015 dog training classes.  They include the popular: Puppy 1 and Puppy 2 Manners (socialization, raising a puppy and obedience), Basic Manners, Intermediate Manners/Canine Good Citizen, Advanced Obedience/Focused Heeling, Nosework, Training Your Own Service Dog, Circus Trick Dog and Feisty Fido (for dogs who don’t get along with other dogs). We’ve also added a new exciting class called Protection Sport Dog. Sign up now, don’t delay as classes fill up quickly.