Should I tell my dog to stay?

Michigan Dog Training

I am often asked the question, “Should I tell my dog to stay?” As noted in an earlier blog article, “3D’s for teaching your dog to Stay,” “I don’t use the word “stay” because I’m very consistent with my dog. Sit means sit and down means down.”

If I tell my dog to “sit,” then I expect him to remain sitting until I release him from that position. If I tell him to go to “place” (such as on a place board) then it’s a location not a position. Again, I don’t need to also say stay as staying on “place” is implied through the training. However, if you’re more comfortable in saying stay, that’s fine. Just realize it’s more for your benefit than your dog’s.

Your dog will learn faster, the more you are consistent and precise in your cues, commands and expectations. Years ago, a college roommate of mine was taking an Abnormal Psychology course. As part of his homework, he asked me to take a 500 multiple question test. I didn’t know the purpose of the test at the time but later found out it was to test a person’s consistency rate. Many of the questions resulted in the same answer but were asked in a  different way.

Michigan Dog Training, brain waves, PsychologyWhen announcing the score, he told me I was abnormal. I replied, “Abnormal!! What do you mean, I’m probably the most normal person you could find!” That’s probably a sign of an abnormal person right there LOL.

He told me that I scored 100% on the test and it was a test on consistency. He further explained that he called me abnormal as hardly anyone scores 100%. A dog training secret is that a high consistency rate is one of the main things that separate dog owners and dog trainers. And, that’s a good thing because consistency can be taught as well as dog training skills.

Dogs learn well when we chuck learning goals into smaller components and are consistent in their delivery. Once learned, we can add them together for the desired end result command. Thus if you’re consistent that a sit means a sit and a down means a down, you don’t need to give another command which is more ambiguous such as “stay.” It’s an added command that really doesn’t have as much meaning for the dog as William Shakespeare, Michigan Dog Training, To be or not to bethe desired command. For example, a dog can’t jump on you if he’s been taught to reliably respond to a sit command. Thus, the stay command is not needed.

As William Shakespeare coined, “To be or not to be,” you can decide to tell your dog “to stay or not to stay.” It’s your choice.

For more information on having your dog trained or learning how to train your own dog, contact Michigan Dog Training in Plymouth, Michigan or call 734-634-4152.

3D’s for teaching your dog to Stay

Michigan Dog Training, teach your dog to stay,

One of every dog’s necessary skills  is to be able to stay either in a position such as sit-stay or down-stay or on Place such as on a place board, dog bed or towel. Whether you call it stay or not, really doesn’t matter. Personally, I don’t use the word “stay” because I’m very consistent with my dog. Sit means sit and down means down.

There are 3 D’s involved when teaching your dog to stay either in a position or on a location. They are: Duration, Distractions and Distance. Despite everyone’s ultimate goal to get to the Distance component as soon as possible, I teach that component last.

I want the dog to be very solid with being able to stay in the position or on place for longer periods of time (duration) and amongst distractions before teaching it with distance. The reason being is because with Duration and Distractions I am near the dog with him on leash. If he breaks position or the location, I can help guide him back into position whereas if I start working on distance too soon, I can’t offer him that help.

However, I know everyone is tempted to start on Distance too soon because that is their end goal. So to feed that temptation without causing training problems, only go a few steps away. With a dog on a 6 foot leash, you’re able to go four or five feet away and quickly return to praise your dog for staying. Don’t go further than the length of the leash until your dog is solid with Duration and amongst Distractions.

Those are the 3D’s of teaching a dog to Stay. I’ll go into more detail of each in another blog post. Until then, check out our dog training services at Michigan Dog Training.

3D's, Michael Burkey, Michigan Dog Training, teach your dog to stay, sit stay, down stay

Should I have my dog professionally trained or do it myself?

Michigan Dog Training, Board and Train, Day Training

 

This ia a question, we are often asked at Michigan Dog Training. So I wanted to take a moment to answer it becuase that’s what we do, answer your questions and provide dog training and behavior solutions.

Michigan Dog Training, Mastiff, Day TrainingWe offer several different training programs to fit a wide variety of training needs and budgets.  If you don’t have the time or patience to train your dog, then Day Training or Board and Train is an excellent choice. Professional trainers do the leg work of training your dog. Then you only have to be trained on how to keep your dog’s new skills sharp. We accomplish this  by providing you with a training session upon completion of either dog training programs (day training also includes a mid-way semi private training session). Pups and dogs who are shy but not aggressive, will  benefit from the socialization that trainers can more easily provide.

If you do have the time and patience to train your dog, then I recommend signing up for our Private Lessons or Group Classes. Young puppies do best by attending group classes to gain the socialization they desperately need before sixteen weeks of age. Otherwise, they may grow up developing fear issues around other dogs, people and their environment. In addition to general obedience classes, we also offer specialized group classes such as Nose Work (fun scent detection), Intermediate and Advanced Obedience, and E-Collar Excellence.

Obedience group classes are the most economical way to train your dog, but they don’t provide the one on one training experience Puppy STAR, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michiganfor you and your dog’s specific needs. Also, if your dog barks a lot during class, he or she cannot opitmally learn and they detract from other dogs’ learning as well. For dogs who have special needs such as fear or aggressive tendencies, private lessons are the best option.  This way, they reside with you at home but they and you receive one-on-one training with a behaviorist or expert trainer. It’s also a great choice for all other dogs because optimal learning comes by private instruction followed by group classes.

This is why we offer our Perfect Group Classes as an added bonus to students who have completed our private lessons, day training or board and train programs. The Perfect Practice group class is a great way to proof what you and your dog have learned  amongst distractions of other dogs and people.

I hope this helps you narrow down your actions. If you need additional help, please give us a call at 734-634-4152.  We’ll be happy to answer your questions.

 

Is training your dog a habit?

Change of habits, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michigan

In business circles, a common topic of discussion is whether or not leaders are born to lead. And so too, I ask are people born with dog training skills or do they develop them?

It may seem obvious, that people develop the skills because most people see the value in getting their dog professionally trained. However, there are those who have a passion and love for dog training as a profession, sport or hobby, have an easier time relating to dogs than others, are easily able to recognize stress, fear and aggressive behavior signs in dogs, and are more coordinated. So which is it, born with greater skills or trained?

Greek Philosopher Aristotle, Michigan Dog Training

Aristotle

Aristotle said it best, “We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act, but a habit.” So too is dog training. Even the most uncoordinated and first time dog owner can learn to bond, relate and train their dog with help from an experienced dog trainer as long as they consider the training of their dog to be a habit and not an one time act.

If you don’t have the time and patience to train your dog then its’ best to have a professional train your dog via a board and train or day training program. However, if you do have the time and patience as well as the motivation and commitment; then group classes or private training lessons are a good choice.

As you progress through the weekly lessons be sure to put practice time on your schedule. Just like going to the gym, it’s more likely to happen if you reserve time on your calendar and commit to it. Otherwise, life gets in the way and your attendance at the gym will suffer. Thus, you need to reserve time on the calendar for you and your dog. Otherwise, life will interrupt the best intentions of training your dog.

The good news is, you don’t have to reserve big blocks of time to train your dog at one time, such as a hour or even a half hour. Frequency of practice sessions utilizing Deep Practice or Deliberate Practice (defined by Daniel Coyle in his book, The Little Book of Talent, 52 Tips for Improving Skills as “The form of learning marked by 1) the willingness to operate on the edge of your ability, aiming for targets that are just out of reach, and 2) the embrace of attentive repetition.”) are more important than the length of the sessions. Therefore, for a pet dog to be transformed into a well mannered family member, I recommend the following minimum training sessions:

  •  Pups 10-19 weeks of age:  10-15 minute sessions, 3-4 sessions per day, 5 days per week
  •  Dogs 20 weeks and older:  20 minute sessions, 3 sessions per day, 5 days per week

Once your happy with your dog’s new obedience skills, you can switch from having scheduled training sessions with your dog to practicing good manners throughout your everyday life. As you remain consistent with the new standards you hold for your dog and for yourself, the training will cease to be an act and grow to be a habit with amazing potential and results.

What are the warning signs of dog dehydration and how to prevent it?

Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michigan, Detroit, summer fun with your dog, dog dehydration

 

Summer is upon us and its a fantastic time to spend outdoors with your dog and human family. It is also dog dehydration, dog drinking water, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michiganimportant to become educated and more concerned about everyone’s hydration including knowing the signs of your dog becoming dehydrated and how to prevent it.

As with humans, dehydration can occur before we realize we are thirsty and dogs often times do not show that they don’t feel well until its a serious condition. For dogs, dehydration can lead to serious life threatening emergencies. So it’s important to provide your dog with frequent access to clean water to drink throughout the day.

In addition to frequent drinking water, here are some other tips:

  • Limit your dog’s outdoor activities to early morning and late evenings when it’s cooler outdoors.
  • Ensure your dog has ample cool ventilation when you are away from the home.
  • Don’t leave your dog in your car on warm days even with the air conditioning running as many dogs have died quickly in cars in which the car stalled and thus the air conditioning turned off.
  • Provide your dog with ample shade when outdoors
  • If you need to walk your dog in public wearing a muzzle for safety purposes, only use a basket style muzzle rather than a form fitting muzzle. The basket muzzle will allow your dog to more readily pant which is how dogs cool themselves off. The form fitting muzzle should only be used for short durations, such as during a veterinarian exam.
  • Store your dog’s veternarian and your local 24 hour Emergency Vet Hospital phone numbers in your cell phone.
  • Locate veternarian offices and 24 hour Emergency Veternarian Hospitals in the areas you travel to with your dog prior to embarking on a trip.

The American Kennel Club has a nice article about knowing the warning signs and preventing dehydration.

They list the following warning signs:dog dehydration, thirsty dog, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michigan

  • “Loss of appetite
  • Reduced energy levels and/or lethargy
  • Panting
  • Sunken, dry-looking eyes
  • Dry nose and gums
  • Loss of skin elasticity”

A dog’s normal temperature is 101-102.5. If your dog has a high temperature and/or exhibits the above symptoms contact your veterinarian (or an Emergency 24 hour Veterinarian if after hours) immediately.

How do I introduce my dog to guests in my home?

Michigan Dog Training, train your dog not to jump

Dogs accepting people into your home can be frustrating. Whether your dog is overly excited or fearful aggressive toward them, it takes training and patience to teach your dog to accept friendly visitors into your home.

With either situation, it’s important to desensitize your dog’s reaction to the sound of knocking or the door bell ringing. You can do this by pairing the sound of either with a tasty food treat. Don’t worry, your dog won’t learn to never bark as I know people still want their dog to alert them to visitors. They will still bark. We just want to reduce your dog’s level of reactivity to the sound so your dog remains in a thinking state of mind instead of a panic reactive state of mind.

To do this, have a family member the dog knows well knock on the door or ring the bell while standing indoors. Yes, the dog will know it’s them doing it but we want to start with easy exercises so your dog can have lots of success. Later, the family member can stand outside while knocking or ringing the bell. Have your dog on leash and when the sound is triggered, stuff your dog with a tasty treat. This way your dog won’t have time to bark. Repeat with many repetitions, and then reward your dog with the treat after he shows a few seconds of calmness upon the sound being triggered. At some point, your dog will look to you when the sound is triggered, when he does, reward with a treat. I call this desensitization process; 1. Stuff a dog, 2. Reward a dog, and then on the dog’s own terms, 3. he’ll look to you for the treat upon hearing the sound.

Michigan Dog Training, German Shorthair Pointer, Plymouth, Michigan, Place command

Hunter on place while Michael writes this blog post.

I also recommend teaching your dog to go to “place” which is a pre-determined location such as a place board, dog bed, or other item to go to and sit or lay down on. Once, on the place board; they can sit, lay down, change positions, etc. as it’s a location not a position. The place board should be within 15-20 feet of the front door and within viewing distance. That way your dog is more likely to stay on “place” if he/she can see what is happening at the door. You will teach your dog to stay on place despite three factors: 1. Duration of time on place, 2. Distractions, and 3. Distance from you as well as able to go to place from a distance.

Once the dog is desensitized to the sound of the knocking or doorbell and understands the “place” command, you can combine the two so that the sound informs the dog that the cue to go to “place” is forthcoming. To see how this is done, watch the below video in which Gabrielle rings the doorbell which told her puppy to go to place on the stairs. This allowed her to come inside without the puppy running outside past her which is what was happening before learning to go to “place.”

For a friendly highly energized dog, leave your dog on “place” when guests enter the home. At first, have your dog on leash so that he/she can’t catapult onto your guest. The dog understands not to leave “place” but will remain in an excited mood. As your dog calms down, have your guest approach your dog who is on place to receive petting.

If your dog re-energizes or comes off of place, have your guest step back while you resend your dog to “place.” Your dog will soon learn that the quickest way to get petting is to remain on place and calm themselves down. You can release your dog from “place” when he/she is calm.

For a highly energized dog or a fearful aggressive dog, obtain personal instruction by calling us at 734-634-4152 or go to Michigan Dog Training.

How do I teach my dog to go to “place”?

dog training, Michigan Dog Training, teach your dog to go to place, behavior shaping, clicker trainingMax and Lucky are attending private dog training lessons at Michigan Dog Training in Plymouth, Michigan with dog behaviorist Michael Burkey. In the video below, they demonstrate how to teach your dog to go to “place” via clicker training and behavior shaping.

Clicker training is using a sound such as the click of a clicker to mark the moment your dog did a desired behavior and to signal that a food reward is forthcoming. Behavior shaping is capturing and rewarding behavior as it occurs such as the dog touching the target stick with his nose versus luring the dog into the desired behavior. Luring tends to be a faster method of dog training but behavior shaping requires the dog to think instead of just follow a hand and thus cements the exercise into his mind more soundly. A dog taught via shaping is also more engaged in the learning exercise and willing to try new behaviors.

Teaching your dog to go to “place” (a pre-designated location) can be helpful when welcoming your guests into your home, having your dog go away from the kitchen table to prevent begging, jump into your vehicle, go to a spot and relax, etc.

Place can be taught via hand luring or in this example by teaching the dog to touch a target stick such as an Alley Pop freestanding target. The target stick is used to get the dog to move away from the handler. Later, the target stick is placed on the mat where you want your dog to go to and the final step is to remove the target stick and simply have the dog go to the mat on the cue of “place”.

The five steps for teaching your dog go to “place” using behavior shaping include:
1. Teach your dog to touch a target stick held in your hand,
2. Teach your dog to touch a free standing target stick,
3. Send your dog to the target stick from a distance,
4. Place the target stick on a mat to start teaching “place”,
5. Remove the target stick from the “place” mat and cue – Place

Number One Best Dog Training Tip

Michigan Dog Training, all dog breeds, large dog breeds, small dog breeds

What is the number one or best dog training tip that a dog trainer can offer? That can be a hard question to answer as there are a lot of things that go into training a dog to have the relationship you desire. However, if you pressed me to answer that question, the answer would be hands down – “consistency.”

Dogs are quick visual learners. They are keen observers and remember your routines. They jump for joy when you pick up their leash telegraphing them it’s time for a walk, they become anxious when you pick up your car keys signaling you’re going to work, etc. One of my clever clients told me that their dog got anxious when she washed her morning water glass as she always did that just prior to putting on her coat and leaving for the day. So sometimes it’s not just picking up the keys or coat that can trigger a response. A dog can recognize an earlier part of the chain of events, especially if you’re consistent in your routine.

When you think your dog has learned an obedience cue via a hand signal or a verbal cue, is that the only thing that triggered them to perform or do other subtle cues prompt them to act? Some examples may include; reaching into your treat pouch before giving a command, learning forward into the dog prior to giving a command to lay down, turning away from them as you want them to exit a vehicle instead of waiting for a command to do so, etc.

Michigan Dog Training, Police K9

K9 Simone

Before I worked on the street as a law enforcement officer, I did an internship in the county jail. That experience taught me I never wanted to work in the jail but it was an interesting social observation. Because the inmates have nothing but time on their hands, they are keen observers of the Correctional Officers’ (COs) routines. And, COs just like all humans are creatures of habits despite trying not to be so. Many of the inmates would purposely try to frustrate the COs for entertainment purposes. Some of the COs recognized it was all a game and were able to not take the inmates’ antics personally. Whereas, many others took it personally and sequentially caused themselves a lot of undue stress that would probably result in elevated blood pressures and other medical conditions.

Similarly, I see many dog owners who are stressed out and struggling with the undesired antics of their dogs. It doesn’t have to be that way. Just like one hires a professional to help them with their taxes, legal matters, and health issues; one should seek help from a professional dog trainer or dog behaviorist. The main thing that separates a pet owner from a dog trainer is consistency. Pet owners can learn how to train a dog but their success level will be dependent upon their consistent follow through.

Years ago, my college roommate was studying abnormal psychology. One of his homework assignments was to have his friends take a 500 question survey. When he scored my results, he told me that I was “abnormal”. I asked jokingly, “what do you mean I’m abnormal!?” He said I was considered abnormal because the test measured consistency and I scored a 100%. We had a good laugh about that and I told him I wasn’t surprised because I recognized many of the questions were the same questions with the same results, they were simply asked in a different manner. He said, well it’s not normal to score 100%. As a dog trainer, this analogy shows me how important it is that we be consistent in our physical cues (intended and unintended), verbal cues, and inflections with our dogs. They are keen observers of our behavior.

To be consistent with your dog:

  • Look how you might be giving unintended cues,
  • Understand your dog is always learning (desired or undesired behaviors)
  • Seek out a professional dog trainer/behaviorist to learn how to train your dog
  • Follow through with the instruction with deep practice
  • Realize your dog is a keen observer of your behavior and
  • Understand your dog’s antics are not personal but rather shows you what your dog still needs to learn.

Michigan dog training, teacherA dear client of mine was struggling to get her dog to go to and remain at “place” (a dedicated location such as a dog bed) while she prepared lesson plans on her computer for her school children. Her dog would do the command during a training session but not when she needed it otherwise. Her dog knew what the command meant so that wasn’t the problem. The problem was consistency. While my client was preoccupied, the dog was no longer receiving reinforcement for staying nor a fair correction for leaving the place.

She became increasingly frustrated with her dog leaving the dedicated place and thus gave up, allowing her dog to come off the place during “non-training sessions” (all moments of time are training sessions). So I asked her a question, “would you ask one of your students to do something that they understood but then take no action when the student simply walked away?” Her response with a smile of passionate enlightenment was, “nooo wayyyy!”

My suggestion was to either be mindful of her dog and be able to respond if her dog stepped off the dog bed or not to give the cue in the first place. It seems like a simple solution and it is. However, many times without a coach (dog trainer) to guide us, we can’t see the obvious because we are stuck in the mind.

Bart Bellon, an internationally known dog trainer coaches dog handlers to know what the rewards for doing are and consequences for not doing. Thus,

1. Teach your dog what to do,

2. Reward your dog for doing,

3. Use fair corrections for not doing, and

4. Above all else be consistent in your approach and response.

Please comment below how you will become more consistent with your dog. And, if you need help, contact Michigan Dog Training in Plymouth, Michigan at 734-634-4152. We can help you!

Key Cabinet Positions for your Dog

U.S. Capitol Building, Michigan Dog Training

Whether you agree with President Trump’s Key Cabinet Appointees or not; it is interesting to watch the selection and confirmation process. It would be interesting to know how President Trump goes about making his selections. How much of the decision process is related to the person’s skill sets and prior experience? Was the person crucial in supporting his bid for the presidency or was he willing to consider those who did not? Are they like minded or willing to question each other for the greater good? And, the confirmation process, what are their agendas in asking specific questions? Is it to further their own agenda or is it truly to ensure the right person is confirmed for the position?

So too it’s crucial to consider each family member’s agenda, skills, and prior experience when selecting a new dog or puppy. Will the right puppy or dog be confirmed to best suit the family’s lifestyle? Are the family members like-minded or willing to listen and compromise on important issues such as:

  • Is this the right time to bring a new dog or puppy into the home?
  • Why are we getting a dog or puppy?
  • Should we adopt or purchase our new family member?Golden Retriever, puppy, pup, puppy training, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michigan
  • Should we get a puppy or an adult dog? Male or female?
  • What breed of dog will best fit our lifestyle?
  • Is it a “should” that we get a puppy or dog or is it a “must” decision? (To be fair to the dog, it must be a “must decision.”)
  • Who will be the primary care takers?
  • Who will train the dog?
  • Where will we take our dog for dog training?
  • How will we properly socialize our new loved one?
  • Who else will take care of our dog and in what way?
  • If there are children, are they mature enough to interact safely with a dog?
  • How will the puppy or dog impact and add value to our life?
  • How will we add value to our pet’s life?
  • Who will be our veterinarian?
  • Can we afford the financial cost of a puppy or dog? (purchase price, training, veterinarian, food, grooming, boarding when away on vacations, etc)
  • Do we have enough time to spend with our puppy or dog?

So, who are your dog’s Key Cabinet Appointees? Do they want the job(s)? And, how will the family (department) carry out the mission and value of bringing a new puppy or dog into the home? And, what are the other considerations your family must consider before obtaining a new family member? Please comment below.

President Trump, Human Needs & Dog Training

Donald Trump, Michigan Dog Training, Plymouth, Michigan, Fear of Change, dog training

On January 20, 2017, Donald Trump became the 45th President of the United States.  The Inauguration lasted approximately five hours. However, the most interesting part for me was the few moments the camera showed Donald Trump just before he walked out onto the swearing-in platform.  He was quiet and looked focused, deep in thought, and solemn.

I found it interesting to study him for this glimpse of his persona because this is not an image of Donald Trump we commonly see. Even more importantly I was intrigued by what he may have been thinking knowing he had captured the ultimate position of power. Was he visualizing his upcoming acceptance speech? And, was he nervous, ecstatic or in wonderment that he was about to become the 45th President of the United States? It would’ve been interesting to be able to read his mind in that moment of time.

Then my thought went to how an incredible feeling it must’ve been to know one was about to walk out and Michigan Dog Training, Gladiator, President Donald Trumpbecome the President; to go from President-Elect to “The President” in just a few minutes. No matter how prepared one is, change is often scary because people thrive certainty. It is one of the Six Basic Needs That Make Us Tick according to Tony Robbins an internationally known Personal Coach and Strategist. Yes, Trump was certain he would be sworn in but what challenges would he soon face as a leader of the free world?

Similarly, people face uncertainty when bringing a dog into their home. They envision the dog will be a welcomed new family member and the joy the dog will bring to their lives. Later, they realize the puppy or dog requires a lot more work to supervise and train than they first envisioned. This causes a disconnect with the original reason they got the dog. It can also cause disagreement amongst family members as they have their own ideas how to train their dog. This is where it’s beneficial to seek help from a professional dog trainer to give you the certainty you need – to build the relationship you desire with your dog and to restore family unity.

In relation to dog training, many people also need Uncertainty, Significance, Love & Connection, Growth, and Contribution; the other Human basic needs. While people seek Certainty to feel comfort, they also need Uncertainty. It provides variety, for example when a person goes beyond teaching their dog basic obedience and learn the exciting dog sport of Nosework. What fun activities do you want to learn with your dog? Please share below.

Learning how to influence and train your dog can certainly make one feel significant. It’s getting out of “the head” by dismissing self-limiting beliefs, deep practicing new skills by chunking them down into easily achievable parts, practicing them slowly, and then allowing the parts to flow back together. This is how you go from zero to mastering new skills.

Michigan Dog Training, Michael BurkeyLove & Connection can be obtained through personal relationships or by getting a dog.  I know this to be true from personal experience as it was a dog who taught me how to talk. I missed out on hearing beginning language sounds until the age of four. The speech therapist advised my parents to get a dog who would seemingly sit still and listen to me trying to make babbling sounds as I petted my friend Princess. How has a dog changed your life? I’d like to know so please share below.

Growth is crucial for self-fulfillment. If we’re not growing, we’re dying. Humans have a need to push themselves and explore their world and themselves. Working with and training a dog provides that growth not only of new skills but also the personal connection with the dog. As Robbins says, “And the reason we grow, I believe, is so we have something of value to give.”

Contribution provides meaning to life. When one gets out of themselves and focuses on the needs of others, Michigan Dog Training, Michael Burkeyone finds fulfillment. This is what motivates many people to adopt a dog from an animal shelter or rescue organization rather than purchasing a dog. They want to provide love and improve a dog’s life that doesn’t yet have a forever home. For me, I make an unspoken contract with each dog I meet that I will be there for them and help their human counterpart better understand them. They cannot speak for themselves so I can be that catalyst for them, ending suffering and restoring peace within the home. What is your contribution? Please share below. I’m always inspired learning about individual’s contributions to dogs and others.

4 actions will make a lasting change in the relationship with your dog:

  • Realize your dog’s behavior is not what you desire and use your suffering to motivate yourself to take action.
  • Know, declare and own that you and your dog deserve a close and fun relationship together.
  • Get clear on how you want your relationship to be with your dog. Commit this to being a lifestyle change.
  • Call a dog behavior expert to help you achieve your dream.

I started this conversation by wondering what President Trump was thinking before stepping out onto the platform and what were his fears as he became the President. So too, I’d like to hear what your fears are in training your dog or seeking out a professional dog trainer/dog behaviorist for assistance. What prevents you from taking action today?